Your neck is part of a long flexible column, known as the spinal column or backbone, which extends through most of your body. The cervical spine (neck region) consists of seven bones (C1-C7 vertebrae), which are separated from one another by intervertebral discs. These discs allow the spine to move freely and act as shock absorbers during activity.

 Attached to the back of each vertebral body is an arch of bone that forms a continuous hollow longitudinal space, which runs the whole length of your back. This space, called the spinal canal, is the area through which the spinal cord and nerve bundles pass. The spinal cord is bathed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and surrounded by three protective layers called the meninges (dura, arachnoid, and pia mater).

 At each vertebral level, a pair of spinal nerves exit through small openings called foramina (one to the left and one to the right). These nerves serve the muscles, skin and tissues of the body and thus provide sensation and movement to all parts of the body. The delicate spinal cord and nerves are further supported by strong muscles and ligaments that are attached to the vertebrae.

Cervical Spine Overview

  • Cervical disc disease

  • Treatment

  • Symptoms

  • Cervical stenosis

  • Surgery

  • Diagnosis

  • Anterior Cervical Disectomy

  • Risks and Typical Outcome

  • Posterior Cervical Laminectomy

  • Posterior Microdiscectomy

  • Anterior Cervical Corpectomy

  • Postsurgery

Education

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