PROFESSOR, 
DEPT OF BEHAVIORAL & CELLULAR NEUROSCIENCE PSYCHOLOGY


RESEARCH INTERESTS

Dr. Grau’s research has focused on a number of topics, including learning, pain modulation, and the recovery of function after spinal cord injury. One line of work has examined whether lower level neural systems within the spinal cord can learn. His work has provided evidence that neurons within the spinal cord are sensitive to both temporal and behavioral relations. Interestingly, this learning appears to involve many of the same neurochemical systems that mediate learning and memory within the brain. More recently, his laboratory has been exploring the implications of these studies for the recovery of function after neural injury. Current research has shown that pain input after injury can increase tissue loss, undermine the recovery of function, and foster the development of chronic pain. Funded by both the Neilsen Foundation and NIH, his laboratory is seeking new treatments to promote recovery and treat pain after injury.

RECENT GRANTS

  •  2014-2018: How and when does peripheral input affect recovery after SCI? Neilsen Foundation, $553,435
  •  2016-2018: Effect of inflammation on recovery and pain after spinal cord injury. NINDS, $402,205
  • 2011-2015: Morphine undermines recovery of function after SCI: Neurobiological mechanisms, NIDA Grant, $1,172,000
  • 2009-2011: Learning within the spinal cord: Clinical implications, NINDS ARRA Grant, $105,194

For  more information on Dr. Grau's experience and interests, please see his Curriculum Vitae

FOR PATIENTS

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